Students’ Connection With France Growing Stronger

Management courses were popular among Indian students, they added. Through this tour, the officials of the Embassy of France in India and Campus France offered students and their parents the opportunity to meet some 20 top French business and engineering institutes. The admission tour was scheduled in four cities including Pune. The Bangalore and Chennai leg of the tour was held in September while the Chandigarh leg will be held on October 5. Caroline Goeny Mentre , heading the scientific and university cooperation at the Embassy of France in India told TOI on Thursday, “In 2000, there were only about 100 students from India studying in France. About five years ago, we created a niche for ourselves in India as far as engineering and management education was concerned. In 2012, 2,600 students from India received admissions into French schools and universities for 700 courses. The rise is encouraging.” Goeny-Mentre said the master’s degree in management in finance, international relations and marketing were the most popular among Indian students. “Besides, we also offer 300 scholarships amounting to Rs 7.1 crore in a year to Indian students in various disciplines which are purely merit based and at the masters level,” she said. To attract more Indian students to France, the embassy in May 2013, eased conditions for obtaining work visas. This allowed a large number of students graduating from French business and engineering schools to extend their stay for work in France.

France military eyes 2014 cuts, far-right seeks to benefit

The cuts come as tensions rise within Socialist President Francois Hollande’s 17-month-old coalition, whose poll ratings have fallen to 23 percent due to dissatisfaction about the economy and jobs. The defense ministry said in April that 34,000 jobs would likely be cut over the coming six years, but its overall budget would remain largely static, steering clear of drastic spending cuts after military officials and lawmakers said that would reduce France’s ability to counter global security threats. “Given the six year objectives, (the cut) should be around 7,000 to 7,500 military and civilian personnel in 2014,” the source said on condition of anonymity, ahead of a news conference by Defence Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian. A handful of bases will be closed or restructured, including an 800-man regiment in the town of Orange in the Vaucluse department, where support for the anti-immigrant, anti-European Union National Front is strong, the source said. Marion Marechal-Le Pen, a National Front member of parliament for Vaucluse, said the cuts would hurt France’s defenses and local economies in areas like hers. “I can only worry about the immediate economic impact in a region that has already been heavily hit by unemployment and economic difficulties,” she said, reacting to media reports about the cuts. “The governments of the right and the left have preferred to sell off our military know-how and lose our diplomatic independence by making small short-term savings. That will cost France’s sovereignty dearly in the coming years,” she said. France’s military employs some 228,000 personnel today. A further 165,000 individuals are employed by the defence industry, not including sub-contractors. The government plans 15 billion euros ($20 billion) in savings next year and 3 billion extra revenues from higher taxes and fighting tax evasion to reduce the budget deficit. (Editing by Tom Heneghan and Robin Pomeroy)

Syria refugees protest in France, seek to go to Britain

Syria refugees protest in France, seek to go to Britain

Pas-de-Calais prefect Robin then went to the site and offered the Syrians, currently illegal immigrants, the right to asylum. “Today, the Syrians present here are caught in a stalemate. What we can do is to offer them a status on French territory…in other words to make a request for asylum,” Robin told reporters. He said each demand for asylum had “95 percent chance of success,” adding that he was in contact with the British embassy in Paris. “We cannot take any decision on their access to Britain,” Robin said. “I am not persuading them to settle in France but trying to legalise their status.” French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius has pledged to fast-track the applications of Syrians seeking asylum. But the protesting refugees, most of whom arrived a month ago in Calais, have voiced disappointment at the way they were treated in France. “We thought that France was the country where human rights are respected,” said Tarik, a 19-year-old from the southern city of Deraa near the border with Jordan. “But we live outside like dogs, hunted down by the police, we see we are not welcome, how can we seek asylum here?” he said. The former engineering student said he was convinced he would find “more humanity” in Britain. Ali, a 38-year-old, said although French President Francois Hollande had taken a strong stand against the regime of President Bashar al-Assad for using chemical weapons, the French were not welcoming at all. “Why does the president say one thing and the police another?” Ali said, adding that he had spent $13,000 (9,500 euros) to come to a country where the “president said ‘we must help Syrians'”. “Here even animals are better treated than us,” he said.

Comments are closed.