United States Government Shutdown Begins As Congress Hits Dead End

The Air Force will begin flying two or three Global Hawks from an undetermined base in Japan next spring, a senior US administration official told reporters during a visit here by Secretary of State John Kerry and Defence Secretary Chuck Hagel. The drones primary mission will be to fly near North Korea, an area where US officials hope they will greatly enhance current spying capabilities. The Air Force already has Global Hawks stationed at Andersen Air Force Base in Guam, the US territory in the Pacific, but North Korea is at the edge of their range and their flights often are curtailed because of bad weather. The Air Force also has Global Hawks stationed in the Persian Gulf. They fly at altitudes above 60,000 feet, placing them out of range of most air defences. Without pilots in the cockpit, they can fly for more than 28 hours at a time, giving them an unmatched range of nearly 9000 nautical miles. The presence of Global Hawks in East Asia is sure to irritate China, which has increasingly pushed back against the US military presence in the region. Officials in Beijing had criticised Tokyo in recent days over reports that the Japanese military was considering acquiring its own Global Hawks, saying the move could escalate tensions. China is also engaged in a bitter territorial dispute with Japan over the Senkaku Islands, an uninhabited group of outcroppings in the East China Sea that Japan nationalised last year, sparking confrontations between the two countries ships deployed in the area. Besides flying missions over North Korea, the Global Hawks would presumably give the United States and Japan better information about the movements of Chinese ships in the vicinity of Senkaku. The same goes for Chinese ships elsewhere in the region, such as the South China Sea, where China is mired in territorial disputes with the Philippines, Vietnam, Thailand and other countries. The US military has flown drones over Japan in the past on a temporary basis, including after the 2011 earthquake and tsunami, but next year will mark the first time it will base them in that country, according to US officials.

United States Steel Corporation : Workers and employers face off at Supreme Court

Secretary of State John Kerry, Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel, Japan Minister of Foreign Affairs Fumio Kishida, and Minister of Defense Itsunori Onodera signed the Protocol Amending the Agreement between the Government of the United States of America and the Government of Japan Concerning the Implementation of the Relocation of III Marine Expeditionary Force Personnel and Their Dependents from Okinawa to Guam. The “Guam International Agreement” (GIA) was signed in 2009, implementing a key aspect of the 2006 realignment roadmap by providing a framework for reducing the footprint of the U.S. military presence in Okinawa, while still maintaining operational capability and a credible deterrent. The planned relocation, which is due to begin in the early 2020s, is an essential element of a strategic realignment to achieve a geographically distributed, operationally resilient, and politically sustainable military presence in Japan. In April 2012 , the United States and Japan decided to adjust the terms of the 2006 realignment roadmap by delinking the relocation from progress on the Futenma Replacement Facility and reducing the number of Marines relocating to Guam from approximately 8,000 (with significant numbers of family members) to approximately 5,000 (mostly rotational/without family members), while maintaining the overall reduction in the U.S. Marine Corps presence on Okinawa through additional relocations to Hawaii and rotations to Australia. The Protocol amending the GIA reflects these changes. Additional changes include: * Clarifying that Japan will contribute up to 3.1 billion in Fiscal Year 2012 U.S. dollars in direct cash contributions to develop facilities and infrastructure in Guam and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands.(The 2012 Security Consultative Committee Joint Statement estimated the total cost of the Guam relocation to be 8.6 billion.) * Affirming that the Government of the United States of America, with the intent to provide reasonable access, shall favorably consider requests by the Government of Japan to use training areas in Guam and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. ((M2 Communications disclaims all liability for information provided within M2 PressWIRE. Data supplied by named party/parties. Further information on M2 PressWIRE can be obtained at http://www.presswire.com on the world wide web. Inquiries to info@m2.com.

United States and Japan Sign Protocol to Amend the Guam International Agreement

But Klinsmann (pictured along with Clint Dempsey ) will tell you that opportunities to fine tune and tweak between now and next summer are precious and few, and squandering these chances to reinforce all good tenets and to further fuse the combinations is wasteful. Either way, hes not going to have that chance over the next couple of weeks; his plan to use these upcoming qualifiers for further World Cup prep is unraveling, and quickly so. Lets look at the first-choice players who will not be available, or who will be limited in their fitness and abilities due to recent injuries: Michael Bradley could return to the training field for Roma this week, but his ongoing ankle injury makes a trip to the United States seem less and less likely. Everybody should know by now that Bradley is the one absolutely indispensable piece to this U.S. puzzle, so any efforts at a top performance begins with their midfield glue. Clint Dempseys hamstring issue (Where did he get this thing? No one seems to know.) has kept the U.S. attacker out of Seattles last two matches. Even if Dempseys condition improves, Seattle is likely to lobby for keeping him, for playoff positioning and Supporters Shield pursuits next week. Considering Dempsey is Major League Soccers top wage earner, it seems like a reasonable request. (MORE: U.S. Soccer and Jones refute reports of injury) Jermaine Jones status may be up in the air; reports out of Germany say surgery will have Jones on the shelf for a few weeks. But Jones and U.S. Soccer are refuting those reports, so stay tuned on this one.

"Congress needs to keep our governemnt open and pay our bills on time : President Barack Obama speaks at the White House in Washington.

Its about fairness for the American people. Even as Republicans such as Representative Peter King of New York complained about the partys strategy, they were relatively united. On the latest proposal, 12 Republicans voted no; nine Democrats voted for the plan. Obama called Boehner and they spoke for almost 10 minutes, Brendan Buck, a spokesman for the speaker, said in a statement. Obama also spoke to the other top three leaders in Congress, the White House said in a statement. There were few signs of progress toward an agreement. You dont get to extract a ransom for doing your job, for doing what youre supposed to be doing anyway or just because theres a law there you dont like, Obama said at the White House on Monday. Times running out. The Senate voted 54-46, along party lines, earlier on Monday to reject the Houses previous plan, in a move that put pressure on House Republicans, who are insisting on tying changes in the 2010 Affordable Care Act, now known as Obamacare, to a short- term extension of government funding after tonight. Senate Republicans floated the idea to extend by one week the funding deadline to avert a shutdown. Reid said no. Democrats urged Boehner to allow a vote on a spending bill without conditions. Thats not going to happen, Boehner said. Australians seeking a visa to work in the US wont be affected by the American government shutdown, a consular official says. The US Consulate in Sydney, which processes visa applications for Australians wishing to work in the US, announced that a shutdown would not affect consular services, which also operate in Melbourne and Perth.

United States roster falling to pieces ahead of remaining 2014 World Cup qualifiers

Quinn, Pamela Harris, a home-based healthcare worker, sued Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn over a state statute that requires public-sector employees to pay the portion of union dues that do not go to political activities. Illinois, like many states, considers such workers state employees because their payments are administered by the state and covered by Medicaid, the federal health program for lower-income people that is administered by the states. Attorneys say the questions presented in the case are nearly identical to those in the 1977 Supreme Court case that set that standard, Abood v. Detroit Board of Education. The justices hinted in 2012 in the last union case the court heard, Knox v. SEIU, that they may be willing to reconsider whether the compelled payment of union dues infringes on free speech. “Knox put into serious question whether Abood is still good law,” said Marquette University law professor Paul Secunda. “Harris might be the vehicle for overruling Abood, making it more difficult for public unions to raise dues.” The second union case, Unite Here Local 355 v. Mulhall, questions whether agreements between unions and private-sector employers that set conditions for unionizing a workplace violate the anti-corruption provisions in federal labor laws. It is illegal for an employer to provide “things of value” to a union. The case contends that some of the terms in these now ubiquitous agreements are essentially bribes. If the court agrees, employers and unions that enter into agreements with such terms would be committing felonies, legal experts say. The two union cases have reached the court in large part due to the efforts of the National Right to Work Legal Defense Foundation, which represents workers that don’t want to be unionized in both cases.

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